Gearing Up for #AskAnArchivist Day

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The members of SAA’s Committe on Public Awareness (COPA) have gathered in Chicago this week to review and rework our work plan for the next year. With #AskAnArchivist Day fast approaching (it’s this Wednesday, October 4th, in case you missed the announcement), we’re dedicating a chunk of time today to get ready our favorite day of the year.

Last year, the COPA members and SAA staff had fun creating promotional memes for the annual event…

…so we’re creating a few more today for a last promotional push.

Follow the official hashtag, #AskAnArchivist, on Twitter–we’ll keep sharing our memes (the good, the bad, and the ugly) up until the big day. And it looks like University of Chicago Special Collections is getting in on the meme fun this morning as well…

Think you can top these #AskAnArchivist Day promotional memes? Share yours on Twitter today and tomorrow to build up momentum heading into Wednesday!

Don’t worry, we’re not spending our entire in-person meeting creating memes. We’ve also come up with a number of questions that we plan to ask throughout the day on Wednesday so that COPA can join the conversation and hear about your archival outreach successes…and failures.

We’ll be asking/prompting:

“What’s an archivist?” elevator speech in 140 characters or less. Go!

What has been your favorite outreach event that brought people to your archives?

Any collections or repositories you’ve heard of that made you say “There’s an archivist for that?!”

…so get your answers ready, and be prepared for more questions coming from COPA! We’ll be using an added hashtag, #ArchivesAWARE, to make it easy to follow our questions.

See you Wednesday!

#AskAnArchivist Day 2017 participants list

 

A COPA Guide to SAA 2017

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Just one month to go until the annual conference in Portland!  As you plan your conference schedule, take a look at the Committee on Public Awareness (COPA)’s guide to all things public awareness-related at SAA 2017: https://archives2017.sched.com/committeeonpublicawareness.

To make it even more digestible, we’ve broken down the Sched list into the top 5 things you should check out.

1.) Be sure to catch our 2nd annual Advocacy Forum on Thursday at noon!  Our timely topic is “Archival Advocacy and Awareness Amid Social/Political Upheaval.”  This talk will be moderated by COPA chair Sami Norling and the Committee on Public Policy (COPP) chair Dennis Riley.

2.) Chat with us during our COPA office hours in the Exhibit Hall on Friday.  We’ll be there from 8 – 8:30 am and 12:30 – 1:30 pm.  We’ll be collecting your Federal Funding Impact Stories, ideas for Ask An Archivist Day 2017 (October 4, 2017), nominations for inspirational archives speakers and stellar collections, and soliciting contributions to this very blog!

3.) Still not sure what COPA does?  If you arrive early, join us for our meeting on Wednesday at 2:00 pm.

4.) Staying late?  Take advantage of all of The Liberated Archive sessions, happening throughout the day on Saturday.

5.) Finally, look at all of that green in the middle of our schedule.  There are so many great sessions highlighting archival outreach to the community this year.  You’re sure to find one which fits your particular public outreach interest.

See you in Portland!

Live Blogging from RAO Marketplace of Ideas, Group 3

The SAA Committee on Public Awareness (COPA) is excited to be joining this year’s purveyors of hot topics and cool demonstrations at the Reference, Access, and Outreach (RAO) Section Marketplace of Ideas at the 2016 Annual Meeting. In the spirit of trying new avenues for outreach, we are not only encouraging attendees to live tweet with #ArchivesAWARE, but are also experimenting in LIVE BLOGGING–RIGHT NOW.

Group 3

Group 3

We are asking groups of Marketplace shoppers some outreach-related questions to get discussions going, and below are some of the responses we are getting LIVE:

1. What was the best new outreach initiative you’ve tried? If not new, what is your go-to for archival outreach?

    • Chemical Heritage Foundation in Philadelphia. Outreach resides with the Museum. Tumblr blog for Library. Has 13,000 followers to date. Have a big following among tattoo artists, who like illustrations. Interact with them through Tumblr. Also have a First Friday program with pop-up exhibits.

      Othermalia

      Othermalia

    • Temple University. Cookbooks, do a potluck with older recipes. People come in and find recipes from a selection of cookbooks.
    • Stanford. History of Information class. Students had to make recipes.
    • Go to. Tufts – Alumni events around commencement..Bring a button maker featuring Jumbo the elephant. Flooded with activity. New series of Tufts traditions.
Tufts button maker and buttons.

Tufts button maker and buttons.

2. How do you measure success for outreach activities? What are your benchmarks?

3. That being said, what have been some of your outreach fails?

4. Who do you consider an outreach superstar (not just archives!)

Live Blogging from RAO Marketplace of Ideas, Group 2

The SAA Committee on Public Awareness (COPA) is excited to be joining this year’s purveyors of hot topics and cool demonstrations at the Reference, Access, and Outreach (RAO) Section Marketplace of Ideas at the 2016 Annual Meeting. In the spirit of trying new avenues for outreach, we are not only encouraging attendees to live tweet with #ArchivesAWARE, but are also experimenting in LIVE BLOGGING–RIGHT NOW.

Group2

We are asking groups of Marketplace shoppers some outreach-related questions to get discussions going, and below are some of the responses we are getting LIVE:

1. What was the best new outreach initiative you’ve tried? If not new, what is your go-to for archival outreach?

  • Chicago. Open Archives Day. Did a tour on a day when enrollment management was doing tours. Got middle school children in to see archives.
  • MIT. Centennial of move from Boston to Cambridge. Made a coloring book and had crayon packets. Hands out at cookouts on campus with children, hands them out at commencement.
  • Arlington, Virginia. Lobby displays in the public library. Took a colorful business postcard and turned it into a puzzle. Have now made five of them. 48-piece puzzle. Adults and children both like it, serves as a conversation starter. About $60 to make one.
  • Library of Virginia. 2 year anniversary of transcribe program. Have programs once a month to have people come in to transcribe. Get a diverse audience of transcribers. Just did a Facebook post on two-year anniversary.
  • Go-to and a fail – inexpensive banners. Picture and a paragraph. Can bring them to different events. Have brought them to County Fairs with someone there to talk about posters, but people didn’t really engage. Over-reliance on go-to activity.
  • Go-to. Behind the scenes tour at the Corning Glass Library. Can be a lot of traffic. Looking at a virtual tour option.
  • Library of Congress. Have users tweet. Give them hashtags.
  • Social Media is a go to.
  • Exhibits and public programs are go tos.
  • Meet-ups at the Library of Congress have been successful, in-person and online.
  • Flicker feed has gotten a lot of people talking about collections and providing information

2. How do you measure success for outreach activities? What are your benchmarks?

  • Statistics. Best performing posts, traffic and interactions.
  • In the case of the puzzle, people continue to use it.
  • Very little setting of benchmarks before events.
  • Measuring the impact by gathering feedback through conversations.

3. That being said, what have been some of your outreach fails?

4. Who do you consider an outreach superstar (not just archives!)

  • Corning Glass Museum.
  • University of Iowa Special Collections social media, especially Tumblr and YouTube.
  • Austin Archives Bazaar.

Live Blogging from RAO Marketplace of Ideas, Group 1

The SAA Committee on Public Awareness (COPA) is excited to be joining this year’s purveyors of hot topics and cool demonstrations at the Reference, Access, and Outreach (RAO) Section Marketplace of Ideas at the 2016 Annual Meeting. In the spirit of trying new avenues for outreach, we are not only encouraging attendees to live tweet with #ArchivesAWARE, but are also experimenting in LIVE BLOGGING–RIGHT NOW.

Almost time to get started. Jill is ready!

Jill is ready to get started!

We are asking groups of Marketplace shoppers some outreach-related questions to get discussions going, and below are some of the responses we are getting LIVE:

1. What was the best new outreach initiative you’ve tried? If not new, what is your go-to for archival outreach?

  • Campus-wide open house at MIT. Cartoon of a character crossing the bridge from Boston to Cambridge, blew it up for people to take pictures with. Used a fake plastic torch for people to hold. Inexpensive, fun thing to do. Photos were tweeted out. Big success with families.
  • Book talk at University of Hawaii. Air conditioner went down. Made fans out of reproductions of pictures of an individual in the archives.
  • University of Wyoming. Faculty members – matched research interests with collections. Invited them to a limited open house. Had materials. Great way to connect materials and faculty members. Had event in the early evening. Did research on faculty beforehand.
  • Southern Illinois University. Working with incoming graduate students. Break up into groups and tell them about sources before they decide on theses and dissertation. Offer pizza and beer.
  • University of Alaska, Anchorage. Go to new faculty orientation. Anthropology faculty are frequently interested. Basic presence where they are has been really helpful.
  • Idea for a bring a friend to work day for student assistants who work in the archives.
  • Center for Jewish History. In-reach. Exhibit about historical cookbooks currently. To augment it they are having a historical bake-off, things like a jello mold with horse radish in it.

Go To’s for Outreach

  • Exhibits
  • Social Media – Twitter, Facebook, blogging, Vine, Instagram
  • Tours
  • Movie Night
  • Teach with primary sources
  • Workshops – Like personal digital archiving. Sexier the better!

2. How do you measure success for outreach activities? What are your benchmarks?

3. That being said, what have been some of your outreach fails?

  • Tours and talks to prospective students, was an uninterested audience.
  • Library audio tour that said front doors of archives were kept closed to keep room cool.
  • University of South Carolina – Twice they reached to every Chair in History and Political Science across South Carolina to generate research use. Reached out to 50 people, zero response. Hard to get faculty to break their patterns.

4. Who do you consider an outreach superstar (not just archives!)

  • David Carmichael was on public radio talking about archives, was very impressive.
  • Art Museum on Southern Illinois campus has a very vibrant community.

Group 1

 Group 1

We’re Live Blogging from the RAO Marketplace TODAY at #saa16!

The SAA Committee on Public Awareness (COPA) is excited to be joining this year’s purveyors of hot topics and cool demonstrations at the Reference, Access, and Outreach (RAO) Section Marketplace of Ideas at the 2016 Annual Meeting. In the spirit of trying new avenues for outreach, we will not only encourage attendees to live tweet with #ArchivesAWARE, but will also experiment in LIVE BLOGGING. 

We have prepared a number of outreach-related questions to start discussions with groups of Marketplace shoppers, and plan to share responses throughout the event, which takes place Friday, August 5, from 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm. Below are some of the questions we’ll be discussing:

1. What was the best new outreach initiative you’ve tried? If not new, what is your go-to for archival outreach?

2. How do you measure success for outreach activities? What are your benchmarks?

3. That being said, what have been some outreach fails?

4. Who is an outreach superstar (not just archives!)

If you are attending ARCHIVES*RECORDS 2016, please consider joining us for lively outreach discussion and the live blogging experiment. And if you can’t attend, simple follow #ArchivesAWARE and this blog feed to follow and join in the conversation!

Archives Awareness on the Redesigned SAA Website

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After many months of planning and development, the Society of American Archivists launched a redesigned website last week. Coordinated by SAA staff members, the new website reflects the work of many SAA constituent groups, including the Committee on Public Awareness (COPA) and the Committee on Advocacy and Public Policy (CAPP).

saa-strategic-plan-goals

The four main goals of SAA’s 2014-2018 Strategic Plan.

As a reflection of SAA’s current Strategic Plan, which prioritizes Advocating for Archivists and Archives as Goal #1, “Advocacy” is now prominently featured on the website’s main navigation bar. In this context, SAA defines “Advocacy” as not only the shaping of public policy that impacts archives and archivists, but also includes the act of raising public awareness of archives collections, institutions, and professionals.

Advocacy Banner

Advocacy links available directly from the main SAA page navigation bar.

Over the past year, COPA has worked to compile the many resources that lived throughout the former SAA website–on various sub-pages, constituent groups’ micro-sites, and external pages like this WordPress blog–and make them available in one centralized place on the redesigned website. These can now be found under “Resources & Toolkits” under Public Awareness.

The current list is just a starting point, with new additions to be added as they are identified. We welcome suggestions for additional Public Awareness resources and tools. They can be shared in the comments below, or e-mailed to archivesAWARE@archivists.org. As the ArchivesAWARE! blog was developed as a forum for sharing and discussing awareness-raising tools, tips, and experiences, we also welcome guest authors who want to highlight their resources on this blog, as a more dynamic compliment to the static Resources & Toolkits list!

Feedback

Just as the Advocacy and Awareness pages will continue to evolve, so will the entire website continue to expand–and the SAA office is eager for feedback. Take the survey and share your thoughts over the next few weeks!